How We’ll Access the Water on Mars

In this illustration, NASA astronauts drill into the Mars’ subsurface. The agency is creating new maps that show where ice is most likely to be easily accessible to future astronauts. Credit: NASA
NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench, called ‘Dodo-Goldilocks,’ lacking lumps of ice seen previously. The ice had sublimated, a process similar to evaporation, over the course of four days. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M

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The Aerospace Corporation

The Aerospace Corporation

We operate the only federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) committed exclusively to the space enterprise.

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