The International Space Station Just Jettisoned the Largest Piece of Space Junk Ever. We Asked a Space Debris Expert What to Expect.

An external pallet packed with old nickel-hydrogen batteries is pictured shortly after mission controllers in Houston commanded the Canadarm2 robotic arm to release it into space. [Credit: NASA]
The Canadarm2 robotic arm, with an external pallet packed with old nickel-hydrogen batteries in its grip, is pictured as the International Space Station orbited 260 miles above the Sahara in the African nation of Chad. [Credit: NASA]

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We operate the only federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) committed exclusively to the space enterprise.

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The Aerospace Corporation

The Aerospace Corporation

We operate the only federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) committed exclusively to the space enterprise.

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